A bimonthly magazine on international affairs, edited in Germany's capital


Shortly after the fall of the Berlin Wall Bettina Vestring spent two years reporting from the East German city of Dresden.


By rejecting the manner in which the EU develops into a defense actor, Washington risks losing its ability to shape that discussion.


On November 1, the UK was supposed to have left the EU, and Ursula von der Leyen was supposed to start her job as Commission President. Neither will happen.


Critics say Germany’s carbon price is too low. But price isn’t the only factor policymakers need to consider. 


The German government’s three new prevention strategies set high conceptual standards, but they need more focus.


Boris Johnson has traded a hypothetical, temporary, all-UK backstop for a certain, permanent one for Northern Ireland only. Meanwhile, France is blocking accession talks with North Macedonia and Albania. 


The right-wing Law and Justice (PiS) party won re-election, but has a tricky four years ahead.


China’s efforts to develop its AI chip industry could provide Europe with important lessons.


While Portugal’s António Costa has managed to forge a stable partnership on the left, insurmountable divisions in Spain mean Pedro Sánchez may struggle to form a coalition even if he wins November’s vote.


MEPs promised Emmanuel Macron they would take vengeance for his destruction of the Spitzenkandidat system. They’ve kept their word.


Ursula von der Leyen is “enthusiastically working toward a defense union.” Without a coordinated stance on European arms exports, this could prove difficult. 


Thirty years after 1989, we in the West still aren’t sure how to celebrate the anniversary—nor exactly which anniversary we are commemorating.


Ursula von der Leyen is pushing aside traditional foreign policy in order to focus on an area where the EU has more power: economics. 


A formidable Spaniard is about to take over as Europe’s chief diplomat, and he will strive to make the EU a heavyweight in international affairs.


The European Parliament has rejected the Hungarian and Romanian commissioner nominees, and the Polish nominee is in serious trouble.


No matter how Canada’s October election goes, Germany’s multilateral agenda is likely to see a transatlantic setback.


The changing of the guard in Brussels offers the French president the chance of a new beginning in Europe.


Germany and France will officially launch an Alliance for Multilateralism at the United Nations General Assembly. They should consider three policy issues that will make or break the Alliance.


Angela Merkel’s government presented a “climate package” that disappointed.


A television experiment reveals how close Germany’s right-wing AfD has moved to Nazi language.