A bimonthly magazine on international affairs, edited in Germany's capital

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Eye on Europe

Views and insights from around the “old continent” and the European Union’s engine room in Brussels


The European Union often fails to make its mark on global affairs due to internal divisions. Scrapping the unanimity requirement for European foreign policy positions could help—but it can’t come without burden-sharing.


The German defence minister has squeaked through by just nine votes. But it is the EU institutions, and not Von der Leyen, who are to blame.


The European Council’s pick is in serious doubt after MEPs left meetings with her this week unimpressed.


Last year member states agreed to reform the EU’s civilian CSDP missions. Now tough decisions loom.


For the first time in over 50 years, a German has been nominated as President of the European Commission. Yet Ursula von der Leyen’s loudest critics are back home.


By choosing Ursula von der Leyen, the European Council has thrown down the gauntlet to the European Parliament.


Angela Merkel’s carefully-crafted compromise idea was rejected by centrist members of her EPP group, including Ireland’s Leo Varadkar.


Boris Johnson may be the best candidate to avert a no-deal Brexit.


National leaders were unable to agree this week on who to appoint for any of the EU’s top jobs.


The much-heralded far-right alliance of Marine Le Pen and Matteo Salvini isn’t much different from the alliance they’ve already had.


But the road to an Italexit would be a twisted one.


Denmark’s Social Democrats won Wednesday’s election and are likely to lead the next government, thanks, in part, to a harsher immigration policy


Appointing the EU’s presidents may involve a protracted fight between countries, political groups, and EU institutions.


A week of intense talks begins to decide who gets the EU’s top jobs.


Faced with threats to its cultural identity, the EU needs to respond, including by cultural diplomacy.


Why Germany might end up getting the presidency of the ECB instead of the European Commission.