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Eye on Europe

Views and insights from around the “old continent” and the European Union’s engine room in Brussels


Libya is a perfect case study for the shortcomings of Emmanuel Macron’s foreign policy initiatives.


Emmanuel Macron’s big idea for an EU constitutional convention may be watered down by Ursula von der Leyen into a sideshow that could then be ignored. The European Parliament, however, wants it to achieve real reform.


Europe has been left as a spectator in the US-Iran conflict as the EU half-heartedly tries to salvage the Iran nuclear deal.


Brexit won’t be “done” any time soon, neither for the UK nor for the EU.


As national leaders debate the next long-term EU budget, climate and defense are proving the two most contentious issues.


The French President likes to make blunt statements that provoke public outrage. Berlin should brace for more to come.


The pro-reform government of Maia Sandu is out. But the EU’s support did not go unnoticed by the Moldovan people.


Austrian economists are proposing a European Silk Road.


In flawed parliamentary elections, the opposition lost its only two seats. Nevertheless, the EU has little choice but to continue is cautious cooperation with Belarus.


This year’s shambles around appointing Ursula von der Leyen as European Commission President shown just how absurd the system has become.


On November 1, the UK was supposed to have left the EU, and Ursula von der Leyen was supposed to start her job as Commission President. Neither will happen.


Critics say Germany’s carbon price is too low. But price isn’t the only factor policymakers need to consider. 


Boris Johnson has traded a hypothetical, temporary, all-UK backstop for a certain, permanent one for Northern Ireland only. Meanwhile, France is blocking accession talks with North Macedonia and Albania. 


The right-wing Law and Justice (PiS) party won re-election, but has a tricky four years ahead.


China’s efforts to develop its AI chip industry could provide Europe with important lessons.


While Portugal’s António Costa has managed to forge a stable partnership on the left, insurmountable divisions in Spain mean Pedro Sánchez may struggle to form a coalition even if he wins November’s vote.