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German Politics

Words Don’t Come Easy: “Tempolimit”

In Germany’s highly-regulated society, driving as fast as you can on the autobahn is seen as one of the last remaining freedoms–for now. It’s …

Close-Up: Robert Habeck

In a political landscape beset by fragmentation, Germanyʼs Greens are going from strength to strength. Their party leaderʼs instinctive ability to reach new voters …

The Last Battle

In a desperate bid to win back voters, Germany’s SPD is shifting to the left. It may be the party’s last chance to turn …


New CDU leader Annegret Kramp-Karrenbauer has often been called an “Angela Merkel 2.0”. In fact, AKK is likely to steer Germany’s conservatives back to …


The experienced politician from one of Germany’s smallest states has often been underestimated–like Angela Merkel.


Friedrich Merz, out of politics for almost a decade, could become Germany’s new strong man—so who is he, and what does he want?


The far-right AfD has gained ever more popularity since its breakthrough in 2017. The party’s rise has been aided by German media and politics, …


In her reelection campaign in 2017, Angela Merkel made a strategic error by not putting EU reform on her agenda. She is now paying …


The Greens’ success in Bavaria is a strong statement against the anti-migrant campaigns of the established conservatives and the far-right.


Merkel’s coalition has agreed a shaky compromise over a controversial spy chief.


Why right-wing extremism is particularly strong in Saxony.


In her first-ever appearance in a Bundestag question-and-answer session, Angela Merkel didn’t break a sweat.


With Germany’s new government finally in sight, Europe breathes a sigh of relief. It may prove a short respite.


The “dieselgate” air pollution scandal leaves Berlin with fewer and fewer good options.


Her fourth government a hard sell, Angela Merkel’s hopeful successors have started eying the top spot.


Germany may be one step closer to building a coalition government, but four months after the election, there’s still a long way to go.