A bimonthly magazine on international affairs, edited in Germany's capital

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Berlin Policy Journal

International affairs from the heart of Europe


The Catalan bid to secede has run aground. This is due to Madrid’s determination, but also to the mistakes of an independence movement intent …


The Russian hashtag #protivvsekh, or “against everyone,” is Ksenia Sobchak’s presidential campaign slogan. But it seems everyone is against the controversial reality TV diva, …


The right-wing populist Alternative für Deutschland, or AfD,  has struck a more moderate tone in Germany’s parliament than expected. But there is still plenty …


The mayor of Słupsk, a small city in northern Poland, has made a name for himself as a rising left-wing star fighting a tide …


Poland‘s Law and Justice (PiS) party has made no secret of its skepticism of the European Union. But if the rest of Europe moves …


Budapest has been ever-more confrontational, refusing to accept a European Court ruling over refugees and ranting against Hungarian-born financier George Soros. But a rift …


Opinion polls show the center-right in the lead, with the populist Five Star Movement not far behind.


Emmanuel Macron was hoping Germany would embrace his vision for reforming Europe. So far he’s got no response.

America has left a vacuum in global free trade. The EU is right in its ambition to step in, but it has to tread lightly.


Hungary and Poland continue to defy the EU’s values and threaten its unity. Brussels needs to flex its muscles, and fast.


The Czech Republic has voted for a billionaire populist. That’s not necessarily bad news for Brussels.


America‘s left and right have embraced Scandinavia. Neither is quite right.


Today’s global frontlines do not run between East and West, but within states – between internationalists and nationalists.

We have lost our editor-in-chief – an outstanding expert, journalist, writer, teacher, colleague, friend.


All the political colors, synonyms, and acronyms you need to know when it comes to forming a new German government.


The chancellor has spent a quarter of a century fending off party rivals. Is there anyone left to succeed her?