A bimonthly magazine on international affairs, edited in Germany's capital

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Berlin Policy Journal

International affairs from the heart of Europe

Europe by Numbers: Plane Accounting

Does Europe have the military power to implement Annegret Kramp-Karrenbauer’s idea for a protection zone in Syria?


The EU can no longer afford to conduct a foreign policy based on the lowest common denominator. It needs to adapt to new realities―and fast.


On external relations, the next European Commission needs to
think bigger than its predecessors.


Emmanuel Macron will need to strike a difficult balance between national self-assertion and EU integration.


Known as a tough negotiator, the EU’s future trade commissioner is used to being unpopular.


So far, Britain and the EU have only talked about exit modalities. Negotiating their future relationship will be even more difficult.


Four of the five parties that make up Finland’s current government are led by women. But does that mean the Nordic nation is a beacon of equality?


Germany’s debt brake needs to be reformed—for the sake of Germany as well as Europe.


The nations of Eastern Europe all have their own versions of populist politics.


Instead of complaining, Germany and others need to back up the European Central Bank by investing in infrastructure and technology.


Some sectors could quickly take action to reduce CO2 emissions. But heavy industry has already done much of the easy stuff.


Washington is escalating its campaign to contain China by blacklisting technology firms. It’s not clear if Europe is prepared to follow suit.


Emmanuel Macron is trying to mend fences with Rome.


As aide to Czechoslovakia’s revolutionary leader Václav Havel and
two-time foreign minister (2007–09 and 2010–13), Karel Schwarzenberg has had a ringside view of Europe’s imperfect.


Gerhard Schroeder’s chancellorship shapes SPD foreign policy thinking to this day―and that is a good thing.


The former French finance minister and IMF chief s likely to continue Mario Draghi’s loose monetary policy, disappointing many Germans.