A bimonthly magazine on international affairs, edited in Germany's capital

We Mourn Sylke Tempel
,

We Mourn Sylke Tempel

Building a Trojan Horse
,

Building a Trojan Horse

The End of the Roth Republic
,

The End of the Roth Republic

Macron’s Serve
,

Macron’s Serve

The Catalan Cliff
,

The Catalan Cliff

A Costly Victory
,

A Costly Victory

Brexit Doesn’t Mean Brexit
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Brexit Doesn’t Mean Brexit

overview


The German Council on Foreign Relations and the BERLIN POLICY JOURNAL team mourn the death of Dr Sylke Tempel.

Russia used social media to influence the German election, too.


The German election outcome signals a return to less consensual politics – which is no bad thing.


Reactions in Berlin to the French president’s proposals for EU reform have been muted – for now.


Tensions are running high in Spain before the independence vote.


Angela Merkel won the elections, but right-wing populists are spoiling the party.


Theresa May’s new plan would only grant the United Kingdom pseudo-independence.


All the political colors, synonyms, and acronyms you need to know when it comes to forming a new German government.


Polish demands for war reparations from Germany could undermine the post-1945 order.


The chancellor has spent a quarter of a century fending off party rivals. Is there anyone left to succeed her?


Create a digital ministry, get behind the EU’s Digital Single Market project, and start thinking about the military use of AI.


Stick to the Minsk agreement and explain the sanctions policy better at home.


The European Union is swooping in to claim the free trade spoils abandoned by London and Washington.


The European Court of Justice’s ruling on relocating refugees deepens the rift within the EU.


It’s been called the most boring election ever. That might be because the parties are avoiding the very issues closest to voters’ hearts.


The CDU and the SPD have returned to door-to-door canvassing, with a technological twist.


Germany is Europe’s leading economic powerhouse, but it has some homework to do after the election.


Meet Paris half-way and let it lead, too, lose your self-satisfied tone, and be more creative in developing ideas to bring the whole EU forward.


Reform education by halving class sizes, cancel the Nord Stream 2 pipeline project, and be honest about strategic realities.


A desperate Theresa May will turn to you for help. You will need to call her bluff.