A bimonthly magazine on international affairs, edited in Germany's capital

Eyes Wide Shut
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Eyes Wide Shut

Containing Gazprom
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Containing Gazprom

Halftime in the Greek Crisis
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Halftime in the Greek Crisis

#ThisWasNotACoup
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#ThisWasNotACoup

Waving the Grexit Stick
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Waving the Grexit Stick

overview


With US President Barack Obama and the 2016 Democratic presidential candidates rolling out their climate change strategies, now is a good time to take a look at what has worked – and what has not – in Germany and the rest of Europe.


The EU’s deficient foreign policy is to blame in part for the current refugees crises. But few in Berlin or elsewhere acknowledge this.


Russia’s President has used Europe’s dependence on Russian gas as a powerful geopolitical lever. But energy geopolitics is a risky game, especially with Brussels now poised to take advantage of opportunities to permanently slash Gazprom’s market share.


The giant consensus machine that is the EU is still running smoothly enough, but Europe – and Greece – will continue to suffer from the euro’s flawed construction.


Germany is facing intense criticism for its handling of the Greek crisis. However, few remember the obstacles the Merkel government had to overcome to reach an agreement with Athens and keep the eurozone together.


The advice coming across the Atlantic illustrates one thing clearly: Washington does not understand the purpose of the European Union and its common currency.


Germany’s finance minister may be (southern) Europe’s most hated man – at home his approval ratings are going through the roof. Pointing to the inner logic of eurozone rules he may have more in mind than the future Europe’s single currency.


The notion of “European solidarity” cuts many ways; right now, it needs to be applied to the EU’s two most pressing problems, Greece and refugees.


Nothing embodies the growing distance between Greece and the 18 other eurozone members like the personal relationship between Angela Merkel and Alexis Tsipras: a drama in three acts.


The fallout with Greece has shown the complexity of governing the eurozone. The time to address the euro’s weaknesses and keep Europe’s single currency credible is now.


The real dividing line in the debate about Greece and the euro is whether Germany and Europe should give in to Athens’ demands, or force Greece to reform? Interestingly, both camps are firmly pro-European.


American experts have no shortage of suggestions for how Europeans could save Greece and ultimately fix the euro crisis. Yet most of the commentary is as uninformed as it is critical.


If we want to keep the Europe we have – we must change it. The European Union needs more integration, and German Chancellor Angela Merkel must lead the way.


As the European Union shows signs of fraying at the edges, some in France are questioning its core.


As the balance of power shifts away from the United States, favoring China and others, the European Union must adapt to a new world order – and try to be a major player.


Europe urgently needs to become a credible actor in international affairs – but to play its role, it has to do a better job framing its stage, its story, and its audience.


In the past 25 years, Russia has gone from being the defining member of the Eastern bloc to a European integration project, only to shift east once again – this time toward China. In which camp will it end up?


The peculiar ways President Vladimir Putin’s regime understands Russia’s past are feeding the current conflict with the West.

After forteen years of a mostly fruitless war, and with the conflict still unresolved, the NATO coalition members have had different takeaways from the attempt at nation-building in the Hindu Kush.


Yemen is headed for all-out civil war, another theater of the sadly familiar cast of proxy wars, sectarian violence, state collapse, and militia rule. The only actors who will prosper are the likes of al-Qaeda and the Islamic State.