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Words Don’t Come Easy


Four of the five parties that make up Finland’s current government are led by women. But does that mean the Nordic nation is a beacon of equality?


Portugal’s government has defied the skeptics and made a success of its uneasy alliance of left-wing parties. But not everyone has benefited. Just a …


In just two weeks, Austrian politics was turned upside down. The “Ibizagate” video caused the collapse of the government and forced the chancellor out …


There are fears that the growing populist forces on the right and left are paving the way for authoritarianism. Yet those same forces can …

Words Don’t Come Easy: “Tempolimit”

In Germany’s highly-regulated society, driving as fast as you can on the autobahn is seen as one of the last remaining freedoms–for now. It’s …


It’s what all sides always said they want to avoid―the return of checkpoints and fences to the island of Ireland. But whatever Brexiteers claim, …


When it comes to refugee and migration policy, the European Union has a knack for inventing pseudo-English terms. Itʼs highly unlikely that doublespeak will …


Hungary’s populist premier Viktor Orbán not only drinks pálinka, but also uses it as a political tool. The robust brandy brings him closer to …


In Italy’s election campaign, political confrontation has given way to a mudslinging contest. Beppe Grillo, the founder of the populist Five Star Movement, has …


How the British prime minister got her stinging nickname.


The Russian hashtag #protivvsekh, or “against everyone,” is Ksenia Sobchak’s presidential campaign slogan. But it seems everyone is against the controversial reality TV diva, …


All the political colors, synonyms, and acronyms you need to know when it comes to forming a new German government.


For French president-elect Emmanuel Macron, these three little words are more than just a phrase he often repeats – they represent a condensed vision of the world as he sees it.


Fragile, whiny, and weak: How the right-wing brands its critics.


Poland’s new strong men prefer to style themselves as persecuted outsiders.


It began life as a variant of Grexit. Fours years on and a referendum later, the term is still devoid of meaning.