A bimonthly magazine on international affairs, edited in Germany's capital

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September/October 2019


As aide to Czechoslovakia’s revolutionary leader Václav Havel and
two-time foreign minister (2007–09 and 2010–13), Karel Schwarzenberg has had a ringside view of Europe’s imperfect.


Gerhard Schroeder’s chancellorship shapes SPD foreign policy thinking to this day―and that is a good thing.


The former French finance minister and IMF chief will soon take over as head of the European Central Bank. She is likely to continue Mario Draghi’s loose monetary policy, disappointing many Germans. But she’s a much better communicator.

Green Foreign Policy DNA

The Green Party’s core policies are global in nature, from protecting the environment to defending human rights and democracy. Acting through the EU is the basis of all Green foreign policy.

Red Herring & Black Swan: Is the German Question Back?

As the transatlantic relationship frays, thereʼs renewed talk of a return to German dominance in Europe. In fact, US withdrawal could have the opposite effect, as Franceʼs military might become more important.


A flurry of AI ethics guidelines have been published this year, by the EU, the OECD, and Beijing. But there are many stumbling blocks ahead before binding rules can be implemented.


Portugal’s government has defied the skeptics and made a success of its uneasy alliance of left-wing parties. But not everyone has benefited. Just a …

Europe by Numbers: The Von der Leyen Budget

Although it was largely absent from the European election campaign, the negotiations over the next so-called Multiannual Financial Framework (MFF)— the EU’s budget—will take …


The post-1989 period brought unique economic success to Central and Eastern Europe. The next generation must update this model. For the West, reengagement is needed.


Boris Johnson appears to have painted the United Kingdom—and himself—into a corner. A no-deal Brexit and an election loom.


In a divided Poland, the trajectory of liberal democracy over the past 30 years is seen as a success by the liberal left. The ruling national conservatives have a very different narrative.


Berlin’s booming film industry has branched out into television streaming services that are reaching a wide international audience. What sells best are stories taken from the cityʼs checkered past.

After 1989, the countries of Central and Eastern Europe followed the same vision. But as the myth of the West declined, their paths diverged and divisions deepened. It’s time to bridge the gaps.


Unlike President Trump, the Pentagon regards climate change as a threat to national security and is undertaking substantial efforts to prepare for the fallout.

The attempt to meddle with the French presidential election of 2017 failed. Still, it’s vital to learn the right lessons. Future disinformation campaigns will be ever more sophisticated.


Sausage-loving Germany is discussing raising taxes on meat. It’s a controversial idea whose time has come.