A bimonthly magazine on international affairs, edited in Germany's capital

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German Foreign Policy


Germany refuses to think strategically about itself, Europe, or the world. This carries a high price.

Well Advised? Hardly

Foreign affairs experts are facing a crisis. The problem is particularly pronounced in Berlin, where advisers and analysts are staring at the ruins of …

Must Do Better

If the EU is to be a global player and not a plaything, Germany must make crucial improvements to its European policy. Traditionally, German …

The Huawei Conundrum

Can Berlin find the courage to ban the world’s biggest telecoms equipment provider from its 5G network? Fear of Chinese espionage must be weighed …

All Hands on Deck

Concerns about fragmentation shape Berlin’s understanding of the EU’s Common Security and Defense Policy. That carries risks, especially with Brexit approaching. Germany, along with …

Enough Babble

Talking about “greater responsibility” has seriously  damaged Germany’s foreign policy debate. Time to ditch it. Policies are about interests. In May 2010, German President …

The Unready Hegemon

German foreign and security policy is not prepared for the new era of great power competition. To stand up for its convictions and values, …


On the eve of the Munich Security Conference, the CDU’s new leader Annegret Kramp-Karrenbauer talks foreign policy with BERLIN POLICY JOURANAL.


For years, Germany has pursued an ambivalent, but lucrative China policy. These times seem to be over.


Will the United States remain nationalist and isolationist even after Donald Trump? German Foreign Minister Heiko Maas seems to think so. But his America …


Rather than making overtures to the Kremlin, German foreign minister Heiko Maas pushes for more cooperation with Central Europe.


With his Saarland background Germany’s new foreign minister Heiko Maas will bring a much-needed Franco-German instinct to the table.


The German foreign policy community is starting to sound repetitive.


Germany is facing a new nexus of foreign and domestic politics.


Today’s global frontlines do not run between East and West, but within states – between internationalists and nationalists.


Reform education by halving class sizes, cancel the Nord Stream 2 pipeline project, and be honest about strategic realities.