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Berlin Policy Journal

International affairs from the heart of Europe


France’s President François Hollande is being criticized for not shielding the French from Germany’s “irresponsible” refugee policy. In fact, France does little to alleviate the crisis.


After the Germans initially greeted refugees with euphoria, one old phenotype of German political discourse has returned, en masse: the “bearer of reservations.”

The EU needs to develop the capacity to respond to the Kremlin’s new soft power offensive both at home and abroad.


Iran’s President Hassan Rouhani is everyone’s darling at the moment, but the international community would do better to approach Tehran with greater caution.


Iran has the potential to be everything the hype insists it is – the last frontier market to fall to global capitalism. European firms are well-positioned to benefit. But realities on the ground are still dire.


Slowing growth in China carries repercussions, not least for the country itself. Four scenarios could result from responses Beijing might adopt.


It should come as no surprise that Europeans are increasingly worried about the mounting immigration crisis.


Ukraine has made significant headway reforming its economy since the revolution. But quite a bit remains to be done, and the short-term outlook is grim.


A kleptocratic regime, mighty oligarchs – Ukraine was an economic mess before the revolution. Ricardo Giucci and Robert Kirchner, who advise the Ukrainian government, discuss Ukraine’s to-do list.


Berlin is more deeply engaged in solving the situation in eastern Ukraine than ever before in an international conflict. State Secretary of the German Foreign Office Markus Ederer on the attempts to make “Minsk” work.


A project to memorialize five Holocaust mass grave sites in western Ukraine is helping pave the road to democracy and reexamine the country’s troubled past.


The president of the European Central Bank has a tough balancing act to pull off – do too little and the common currency will fall apart; too much, and European policy-makers won’t take steps necessary to strengthen it.


Twenty-five years after German reunification, the European Union is struggling to come to terms with the consequences of that profound shift – as is Germany itself.


Berlin has been vilified for its handling of Greece, but 2015 has actually been a banner year for German diplomacy: de-escalating the crisis in Ukraine, finding agreement over Iran’s nuclear program, and avoiding a Grexit.


Without TTIP Europe’s competitiveness in the global market is in danger, especially in light of the TPP agreement the US is negotiating with Asia.


Think that a “Merkel doctrine” is an oxymoron? Wrong: Ertüchtigung – loosely, “help for self help” – sounds outdated even to German ears, but the concept behind it is useful today.