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Beyond the Seas

Notes on new powers and old problems: China, India, the Middle East, and beyond


A new settlement bill challenges Israeli Prime Minister Netanyahu’s ability to control his coalition.


What will happen if Donald Trump moves the US embassy in Israel?


No one expected shale producers to survive extended low oil prices, but they have. The next act could prove even more destabilizing.


China’s recent setback might further escalate the confrontation in the South China Sea.


Digital sovereignty and control of information are central to China’s cyber strategy.


Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu continues to undermine Israel’s democratic institutions.


There are compelling reasons for the EU to use the OSCE to engage China on security issues of joint concern.


As Europe turns its eyes to a revitalized Argentina, both Brussels and Buenos Aires need to foster long-term engagement.


On the streets of Tel Aviv and elsewhere there’s worry about the influx of Arab refugees to Germany.


London and Beijing are getting closer – at a cost.

Is the Russian-Iranian cooperation in Syria a marriage of convenience or the emergence of an alliance?


Paradoxically, the agreement over the Iranian nuclear program is likely make things more difficult for President Hassan Rouhani. Rather than bolstering the forces of reform, the deal may end up having the opposite effect.


Its foreign policy in tatters, Turkey reluctantly joins the anti-IS coalition.


The European Union and India have quite a bit to offer one another. Why is it so difficult to get them to talk?


China’s proposals to facilitate the Afghan reconciliation process – and signals from Kabul and Islamabad that peace talks may soon be underway – pose the question of what a more serious Chinese diplomatic role in Afghanistan can be expected to achieve.


Since July 2014 the price of oil has been falling, and a new OPEC strategy pushed through by Saudi oil minister Ali Al-Naimi makes a reversal unlikely in the near future. OPEC felt obliged to defend its market share against US fracking firms and other “marginal producers.” The pain felt in Moscow, Tehran, and Caracas is an unintended – if not unwelcome – byproduct.