A bimonthly magazine on international affairs, edited in Germany's capital

A Strange Double-Act
,

A Strange Double-Act

Beggar Thy Neighbor
,

Beggar Thy Neighbor

In the Dark of the Night
,

In the Dark of the Night

Bibi’s Test Case
,

Bibi’s Test Case

Pyrrhic Victory
,

Pyrrhic Victory

Island of the Blessed
,

Island of the Blessed

An Uneasy Marriage
,

An Uneasy Marriage

overview


No one expected shale producers to survive extended low oil prices, but they have. The next act could prove even more destabilizing.


How the EU, Russia, and China can protect the Iran nuclear deal.

President-elect Donald Trump has suggested alarming changes to American trade policy.


Assertive rhetoric about European security autonomy rings hollow.


President-elect Trump’s relationship with Putin is likely to run into obstacles.


As his last bow in Europe, Barack Obama passionately defended Western values with “his closest ally,” Angela Merkel.


Will France fall to the West’s populist surge, too?


Europe and Donald Trump – the contents of our new issue.


What links Donald Trump’s victory, the Brexit vote, and support for Marine Le Pen’s Front National?


The “unthinkable” has happened – again. The consequences for Europe and the world loom large.

Here’s what a Trump presidency could mean for Europe.


Political uncertainty in Washington makes the necessity of a common European defense more urgent than ever.


Trump supporters voted to shatter America’s static political landscape. They may end up with a spectrum familiar to Europeans.


This fall, Germany’s chancellor has been facing mutiny within her own ranks. But Angela Merkel has decided to fight.


Spain’s new-old prime minister has weathered every storm that’s come his way, but major challenges remain.


What’s next for the European Union?


Italy is heading to the polls to vote on constitutional reform on December 4 – and the EU will be watching closely if yet another member descends into political chaos.


Greek Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras started out as the far-left David taking on the EU-IMF Goliath. Now he is seen as Berlin’s poodle.


It began life as a variant of Grexit. Fours years on and a referendum later, the term is still devoid of meaning.


It might seem like Russians stand firmly behind their president. Not so, says opposition leader Ilya Yashin. But the opposition has trouble making itself heard.