A bimonthly magazine on international affairs, edited in Germany's capital

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Berlin Observer

Critical notes on German foreign policy and a peek behind the curtain of a newly indispensable nation


The right-wing AfD has shown itself a force to be reckoned with.


Why the regional elections of March 13 signal a shift in Germany’s political landscape.


Germany’s right-wing AfD populists should not be taken seriously.


After ten years in office, the German Chancellor at last surprises our columnist.


Why Germany is engaging in France’s war against the so-called Islamic State.


Germans are becoming impatient with the way Chancellor Angela Merkel is approaching the refugee crisis.


The current wave of immigration presents a huge opportunity for Europe.


One year on and against the backdrop of a worsening refugee crisis, the self-appointed “defenders of the Occident“ have radicalized.


Many Germans still believe the chancellor was right when she opened the borders to hundreds of thousands of refugees. But doubts are growing, and her party, too, is becoming nervous. Could her job be at stake?


The refugee crisis is forcing Germany to define German values.


The EU’s deficient foreign policy is to blame in part for the current refugees crises. But few in Berlin or elsewhere acknowledge this.


Germany’s finance minister may be (southern) Europe’s most hated man – at home his approval ratings are going through the roof. Pointing to the inner logic of eurozone rules he may have more in mind than the future Europe’s single currency.


Angela Merkel’s government seem to be taking the accelerating Greek crisis in good spirits, and it isn’t hard to see why: with Sunday’s referendum, Greece’s government has taken the country’s fate into its own hands


German Chancellor Angela Merkel may not be to blame for the crisis in Greece, but her handling has contributed to the emergency the euro finds itself in now.


There was nothing he wouldn’t sell and very little he couldn’t buy. Alexander Schalck-Golodkowski was communist East Germany’s foremost capitalist. Having outlived the state he served by a quarter century, he died on June 21 at the age of 82.


This week’s G7 meeting at Schloss Elmau may not have produced many tangible results, but it did offer yet another display of the power German Chancellor Angela Merkel currently wields in Europe.